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The United Nations Food And Agriculture Organization: Wood Energy Is Not A Sleeping Giant
- May 29, 2018 -

"Despite the modernization and rapid growth of timber energy use, it has some obvious advantages in the renewable energy mix, but it is still a sleeping giant ignored by the whole world."

"Despite the modernization and rapid growth of timber energy use, it has some obvious advantages in the renewable energy mix, but it is still a sleeping giant ignored by the whole world."The experts reached this conclusion in a new study carried out by the forestry and timber sectors of the United Nations economic commission for Europe/fao with the support of the government of Finland.

A modern wood fuel, because of their efficient combustion, convenience, and they have a higher energy density than traditional wood the fact that the United Nations economic commission for Europe area "wood is used for power generation and power" is changing.The United Nations economic commission for Europe/fao federation of forestry and timber sectors emphasized.

When asked about the human how to realize the goal of sustainable development (SDG - 7), "to make sure before 2030 to provide all the price is reasonable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy, renewable energy sources include: solar photovoltaic (pv), wind turbines, geothermal power, heat pump, tidal power plants or other electric power technology solutions.However, timber energy, the world's renewable energy giant, has been neglected or seen as unmodernized.

By ece/fao forestry and wood in the Finnish government compiled under the auspices of the titled "wood energy ece region: Europe, commonwealth of independent states and data, trends and outlook of North America" the latest research report, the panel of experts stressed: wood energy has modernization and rapid development.

The production and distribution of wood pellets supports employment in the forestry sector in the United Nations economic commission for Europe region, usually in rural areas where jobs are needed.This development also provides the low value of the residual wood products market choice, such as sawdust, wood and wood from harvest site after consumption of branches, the wood is often seen as have no value, so they stay in the woods or in the harvest of the forest area were destroyed.

The study reveals the current state of wood energy, the types of wood fuels used, the main sources and users, the public policy tools that support and hinder their use, and how to purchase wood sustainably.It also provides a perspective on how current social, economic and political trends and developments shape the future of wood for energy and its sustainable production.

In many developing countries, wood energy provides most of the energy supply. Surprisingly, in some developed countries, wood energy provides nearly 25 percent of the energy supply.Timber remains Europe's leading renewable energy source, accounting for about 45 per cent of renewable primary energy.

Increase the share of renewable energy and reduce carbon emissions policies and measures on the increase of wood has played a powerful role of energy utilization, and with the rapid rise in the price at the beginning of this century, prompting more widely use of wood energy, especially in Europe.

Timber has some obvious advantages in the renewable energy mix.It does not have the same limitations as other renewable energy sources because it is easy to store and can continue to provide energy even without the potential for sunlight, wind power or hydropower.

The study also noted that the use of wood as an energy source could have a negative impact if it is not used properly.If used inefficiently, wood energy may become an important source of indoor and outdoor pollution.If sustainable practices are not followed, the collection of wood fuel may lead to forest degradation.

Nevertheless, if best practices are applied to procurement, processing and combustion efficiency, wood energy can be a very clean and sustainable fuel.Using improved stoves and fuel can reduce particulate emissions from traditional open fireplaces by more than 95 percent.